Tag Archives: citizen

how i voted in the Consolidated General Election — Tuesday, November 8, 2016

PRESIDENT AND VICE PRESIDENT: Jill Stein and Ajamu Baraka (G)
UNITED STATES SENATOR: Kamala D. Harris (D)
UNITED STATES REPRESENTATIVE: Nancy Pelosi (D)
STATE SENATOR: Jane Kim (D)
MEMBER OF THE STATE ASSEMBLY: Phil Ting (D)
JUDGE OF THE SUPERIOR COURT, OFFICE NO. 7: Victor Hwang

MEMBER, BOARD OF EDUCATION: Mark Sanchez, Matt Haney
MEMBER, COMMUNITY COLLEGE BOARD: Rafael Mandelman, Tom Temprano, Shanell Williams

PROP 51: No
PROP 52: No
PROP 53: No
PROP 54: Yes
PROP 55: Yes
PROP 56: No
PROP 57: Yes
PROP 58: Yes
PROP 59: Yes
PROP 60: No
PROP 61: Yes
PROP 62: Yes
PROP 63: Yes
PROP 64: Yes
PROP 65: No
PROP 66: No
PROP 67: Yes

PROP A: Yes
PROP B: Yes
PROP C: Yes
PROP D: Yes
PROP E: Yes
PROP F: Yes
PROP G: Yes
PROP H: Yes
PROP I: No
PROP J: No
PROP K: No
PROP L: No
PROP M: No
PROP N: Yes
PROP O: No
PROP P: No
PROP Q: No
PROP R: No
PROP S: No
PROP T: Yes
PROP U: No
PROP V: Yes
PROP W: Yes
PROP X: No
PROP RR: Yes

MEMBER, BOARD OF SUPERVISORS, DISTRICT 1:
1. Sandra Lee Fewer
2. Jonathan Lyens
3. Marjan Philhour Continue reading

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selections from Civil Disobedience

“That government is best which governs not at all”; and when men are prepared for it, that will be the kind of government which they will have. (385)

But, to speak practically and as a citizen, unlike those who call themselves no-government men, I ask for, not at once no government, but at once a better government. Let every man make known what kind of government would command his respect, and that will be one step toward obtaining it. (386)

I cannot for an instant recognize that political organization as my government which is the slave’s government also. (389)

There are nine hundred and ninety-nine patrons of virtue to one virtuous man. (391)

It is not a man’s duty, as a matter of course, to devote himself to the eradication of any, even the most enormous wrong; he may still properly have other concerns to engage him; but it is his duty, at least, to wash his hands of it, and, if he gives it no thought longer, not to give it practically his support. If I devote myself to other pursuits and contemplations, I must first see, at least, that I do not pursue them sitting upon another man’s shoulders. I must get off him first, that he may pursue his contemplations too. (393)

Some are petitioning the State to dissolve the Union, to disregard the requisitions of the President. Why do they not dissolve it themselves,–the union between themselves and the State,–and refuse to pay their quota into its treasury? (394)

Unjust laws exist: shall we be content to obey them, or shall we endeavor to amend them, and obey them until we have succeeded, or shall we transgress them at once? Men generally, under such a government as this, think that they ought to wait until they have persuaded the majority to alter them. They think that, if they should resist, the remedy would be worse than the evil. But it is the fault of the government itself that the remedy is worse than the evil. It makes it worse. Why is it not more apt to anticipate and provide for reform? Why does it not cherish its wise minority? Why does it cry and resist before it is hurt? Why does it not encourage its citizens to be on the alert to point out its faults, and do better than it would have them? Why does it always crucify Christ, and excommunicate Copernicus and Luther, and pronounce Washington and Franklin rebels? (395)

If the injustice is part of the necessary friction of the machine of government, let it go, let it go: perchance it will wear smooth,–certainly the machine will wear out. If the injustice has a spring, or a pulley, or a rope, or a crank, exclusively for itself, then perhaps you may consider whether the remedy will not be worse than the evil; but if it is of such nature that it requires you to be the agent of injustice to another, then, I say, break the law. Let your life be a counter friction to stop the machine. What I have to do is to see, at any rate, that I do not lend myself to the wrong which I condemn. (396)

I came into this world, not chiefly to make this a good place to live in, but to live in it, be it good or bad. A man has not everything to do, but something; and because he cannot do everything, it is not necessary that he should do something wrong. (396)

Under a government which imprisons any unjustly, the true place for a just man is also a prison. (398)

Confucius said: “If a state is governed by the principles of reason, poverty and misery are subjects of shame; if a state is not governed by the principles of reason, riches and honors are the subjects of shame.” (401)

The progress from an absolute to a limited monarchy, from a limited monarchy to a democracy, is a progress toward a true respect for the individual. Even the Chinese philosopher was wise enough to regard the individual as the basis of the empire. Is a democracy, such as we know it, the last improvement possible in government? Is it not possible to take a step further towards recognizing and organizing the rights of man? There will never be a really free and enlightened State, until the State comes to recognize the individual as a higher and independent power, from which all its own power and authority are derived, and treats him accordingly. I please myself with imagining a State at last which can afford to be just to all men, and to treat the individual with respect as a neighbor; which even would not think it inconsistent with its own repose, if a few were to live aloof from it, not meddling with it, nor embraced by it, who fulfilled all the duties of neighbors and fellowmen. A State which bore this kind of fruit, and suffered it to drop off as fast as it ripened, would prepare the way for a still more perfect and glorious State, which also I have imagined, but not yet anywhere seen. (413) Continue reading

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